More than a curiosity: X-rays by Worsnop and Chalklin.

Methuen, 1946. 126 pages.

Methuen’s Monographs on Physical Subjects was a long-running series of slim volumes dealing with a wide range of subjects, from AC power transmission to cosmology. This particular example is the 1946 revision of Worsnop’s 1930 volume. It covers quite fundamental topics, including the properties and generation of X-rays (pre-synchrotron, of course), scattering (Thomson and Compton), refraction, diffraction, spectroscopy (including Auger) and the importance of X-ray studies in supporting the development of quantum theory.

Cover of X-rays by Worsnop and Chalklin.

Cover of X-rays by Worsnop and Chalklin.

It may seem on the surface that a book from seventy years ago would be of nothing but historical interest. This is in fact not true. The volume gives a very clear account of how an X-ray tube works — and these are still the most common sources of X-rays — and explains how the X-ray spectrum is obtained, with its continuous background and characteristic radiation. It also traces out how X-rays were first characterised, their wavelengths determined, their properties explored in early important experiments. And these both give a sense of the history of the field, but also present some important physics in a very accessible way. Yes, it does in places use the ‘X-unit’ which was not destined to remain part of the field, and refers to ‘centrifugal force’ in a way which I think suggests that the author has not thought clearly about some fundamental aspects of mechanics (or that word usages have changed a little).

xrays_worsnop_preface

These little books show up here and there in jumble sales and book shops, and I’ve accumulated a small subset of them. They are very readable, though pitched at a fairly high level — this is not popular science! — and I continue to pick them up when I see them.

For workers in the field.

For others.

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About Darren

I'm a scientist by training, based in Australia.

2 responses to “More than a curiosity: X-rays by Worsnop and Chalklin.”

  1. Jessica says :

    Hi Darren,

    I’m not sure how familiar you are with the author, but Chalklin died in a plane crash at Kalang Airport, Singapore in 1954. He was my grandfather’s supervisor and mentor, but I understand most of the work that they had been completing was destroyed in the crash (Chalklin had been taking it to colleagues in the UK).

    Thanks to your post I have found the book online and plan to give it to my grandfather. I really appreciate finding this – many thanks for the post!

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